• There's a Crick in My Neck!

    February 22, 2015 09:38 PM

    As chiropractors, we see patients for back pain, neck pain, joint pain, and a variety of other ailments. Unfortunately, many people do not realize that chiropractors treat neck pain and headaches. You might think this odd since the neck is part of the spine, but it is true. There are many people who associate chiropractors only with back pain. I'm here to help set the record straight.
     
    Have you ever woken up with neck pain and thought, "I just slept wrong?" While you may be correct, in that you slept in an odd position for too long, you may also have an underlying issue such as a subluxation (a misalignment of your spine). Subluxations can cause discomfort in your spine as well as other issues such as headaches, radiating pain, numbness, or tingling.
     
    The best thing you can do for yourself when you experience neck pain is to call a chiropractor! Call one of our convenient Triangle area locations today for a free consultation to see how chiropractic can help.
    Posted by: Dr. Betsy Case-Luca
  • Lift With Your Knees!

    February 13, 2015 03:30 PM

    It's not uncommon for people to come into our office with complaints of back pain after lifting something. The old adage "lift with your knees" exists for a reason. Here are a few helpful tips for lifting to help prevent back injury. Whether you are lifting a box, your heavy bookbag, or weights at the gym, these will apply.

     

    - Bend at the knees and keep your back straight when lifting. This uses your leg muscles along with your back muscles to lift and help prevent injury.

    - Tighten your core muscles when lifting. Doing so will stabilize your back while lifting.

    - Lift slowly and don't lift too much at once. If you lift too quickly or too much, you risk injuring yourself.

     

    Talk to your chiropractor about tips for lifting properly. Call one of our convenient locations today for an appointment.

    Posted by: Dr. Nick Ferez
  • Don't Slip and Fall!

    February 05, 2015 11:29 AM

    While we're already entering February and haven't seen much ice yet, we have had patients traveling to different parts of the country with ice and snow. We've seen just a little of the slick stuff here and, as many of us that have lived in North Carolina for awhile know, our winters follow their own rules. That being said, in case we do see some ice or you are traveling somewhere with colder weather, here are some tips for being safe in slick conditions.

    - If you know there is ice or snow coming your way, put some rock salt out on the sidewalk and driveway. This will help prevent the ice from sticking.

    - Make sure you wear shoes with a good tread. Fashion is not important in these conditions! Staying warm is what is most important and by wearing shoes with a good tread, you are less likely to slip.

    - If you need to get out and shovel snow off the walk, be sure to stretch first. This may seem silly, but we often get an icy mix in our snow in North Carolina and need to put a little "elbow grease" into shoveling. Stretching will help prevent strain on your upper and lower back.

    - If you are planning a trip for some fun winter activities such as snowboarding or skiing, train your body by doing lunges and squats. These exercises will condition your muscles for the activity you have planned.

    You can read more about what the American Chiropractic Association has to say about preparing for winter activity here. Call one of our convenient locations today to schedule an appointment with one of our chiropractors to discuss ways to keep your spine healthy and prevent injury during activity.

    Posted by: Dr. Richard Armstrong
  • The Lighter Side of Dark Chocolate

    February 01, 2015 08:14 PM

    Most of us think of chocolate as a guilty pleasure. Something we can eat and then feel bad about later, having to go to the gym to work off. Well, I'm here with good news! Dark chocolate has health benefits! It's not all bad! Granted, this is in moderation. This does not mean you can go buy a giant bag of Hershey's© dark chocolate pieces and eat the whole thing for lunch. However, eating a piece or two here or there can actually be good for you.

    Dark chocolate is high in antioxidants. What does this mean? You can eat dark chocolate and stay younger and healthier! Dark chocolate is also high in essential nutrients such as fiber, iron, and magnesium. It can reduce risk factors for disease by lowering susceptibility to LDL (bad) cholesterol and increasing susceptibility to HDL (good) cholesterol.

    Keep in mind when you choose your dark chocolate to get dark chocolate with 70% or higher cocoa content. Otherwise, you will not reap the health benefits. Also, Don't forget the key word - MODERATION!

    Call one of our convenient locations today to discuss nutrition at your next chiropractic appointment.

    Posted by: Alan Houfek
  • 3 Ways To Boost Your Metabolism

    January 25, 2015 09:56 PM

    Health and Wellness Exercise Nutrition

    Patients frequently discuss their diet and nutrition with us. We often hear people say that they can't lose those last few pesky pounds. Here are a few ways to boost your metabolism.

    1. Never Skip Breakfast! Not only is breakfast the most important meal of the day, but eating in the morning will jumpstart your calorie burn for the day. Keep your breakfast healthy and nutritional to get the best start to your day.

    2. Eat the Correct Number of Calories Knowing the correct calorie intake for your height and weight can play a big part in boosting your metabolism. If you are also trying to lose weight, subtract calories from the recommended calorie intake for you. Talk to your doctor to find out the best way to determine your correct calorie intake.

    3. Exercise Regularly Not only does burning calories boost your metabolism, so does building muscle. Muscle burns more calories than fat.

    Call your local Chiropractic Partners office today to schedule an appointment and discuss your nutrition and wellness.

    Posted by: Dr. Sean Smith